UX Designer by day // writer by night
Blackboard Case Study

Blackboard Case Study

Blackboard Case Study

Blackboard Case Study

At Brainstation - I partnered up with Katrina Davis to work on a redesign for an app. Seeing as, the both of us attended the University of Toronto, and had trouble with the Blackboard app we decided to look into it and conduct a heuristic analysis.

Research

Total enrolment at the University of Toronto is 80,000 students per year - students use the blackboard app, or web to check for assignments grades and check for their upcoming assignments. 

 

Painpoints for Students:

- Informational hierarchy, and architecture is lost with grades

- Checking for any course syllabus is a hassle

- Contacting and emailing professors for certain courses is inaccessible

Main Dashboard - BEFORE

Main Dashboard - BEFORE

The main dashboard was complicated for students to use, in the sense that it listed courses that the students are enrolled in but as soon as they clicked on any course they are transferred to a web optimized version of Blackboard.

Main Dashboard - AFTER

Main Dashboard - AFTER

Eliminating the hassle of having to go through a web optimized page, which contains information that students aren't going to use when using the app on their phone we eliminated the task of needing to go through the web optimized page. Instead, we directly take them to the pages of the courses that they intend on using.

Task Flow - BEFORE

Task Flow - BEFORE

After speaking to our classmates and interviewing them we collected a bunch of information regarding what they deem as most important when using an app like blackboard. 

There were four main takeways:

1. Announcements are seen as important because they remind students of what it is they need to do.

2. Syllabus is important so they stay on track and see how much every assignment is worth.

3. Grades to check how well they're doing on the course

4. Contacting professors, and teaching assistants

Task Flow - AFTER

Task Flow - AFTER

After gathering all the information about what students see as most important, we eliminated unnecessary options and kept grades, announcements, course materials, syllabus. 

Also, for the grades page, information was displayed in a clearer manner than it was before, students could click on their grades and see the total at the top with the break down at the bottom. Also instead of having to go through two slides of a syllabus it was all gathered in one.